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Izmir Festival > Program > PENDERECKI TRIO

Thursday, July 6, 2023 • Celcus Library • 21.00
 
SPECIAL PROJECT TO COMMEMORATE 90 ANNIVERSARY OF
KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI
 
PENDERECKI TRIO
 
Leticia Moreno, violin
Claudio Bohorquez, cello
Łukasz Krupiński, piano
 
Program
 
FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN
Sonata g minor op. 65 for cello and piano (1845-47)
Allegro moderato / Scherzo: Allegro con brio / Largo / Finale: Allegro
 
JOZEF WIENIAWSKI 
Piano Trio G Major op. 40 (1885)
Allegro/ Andante molto cantabile/ Allegro con fuoco / Allegro risoluto e non troppo presto
 
KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI
1st Sonata (1954) version for cello and piano (2020)
Allegro / Andante (attacca) / Allegro vivace
 
KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI 
Chaconne in memorial del Giovani Paolo II  transcribed by Jaejoon Ryu for a piano trio (2020)
 
 
SPECIAL PROJECT TO COMMEMORATE 90 ANNIVERSARY OF KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI
 
2023 marks the third anniversary of the death and the 90th anniversary of the birth of Krzysztof Penderecki, one of the greatest contemporary composers, whose work had a significant impact on the world music of the 20th and 21st centuries. On July 6, 2023, you will be able to listen to e.g. European and Asian premiere of Krzysztof Penderecki's Chaconne in memorial del Giovani Paolo II performed by the Penderecki Trio.
Chaconne, a piece dedicated to Pope John Paul II, comes from the famous Polish Requiem, a vocal-instrumental work by Penderecki for mixed choir, soloists and orchestra. It was composed in the years 1980-1984. Individual parts commemorate important figures in the history of Poland (hence the name of the work). In 2019, the composer established the Penderecki Trio, to which he planned to invite outstanding soloists known to him in order to popularize contemporary chamber music. He planned to arrange the Chaconne from the Polish Requiem for the Trio, but unfortunately the plans were interrupted by the Composer's death. The work was eventually arranged by his former student and close collaborator, Korean composer Jeajoon Ryu.
The Grammy winning composer and conductor Krzysztof Penderecki was born on 23 November 1933 in Debica, Poland. His works created in the 1960s brought him worldwide fame. His international success was due to such works as "Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima" (gave a lasting musical expression to the age of atom bomb anxiety) or St Luke Passion premiered in Münster Cathedral in 1966.
Many of his works were commissioned for special occasions, like Paradise Lost after Milton, which was written for the US Bicentennial celebrations. Penderecki’s music is regularly performed by the world’s leading soloists and conductors. His compositions were often quoted in films, most famously by Stanley Kubrick in The Shining.
The Penderecki Trio: Leticia Moreno - violin, Claudio Bohorquez - cello, Łukasz Krupinski - piano is a new, excellent music ensemble, with outstanding instrumentalists, winners of international music competitions, and above all, musicians who have been cooperating for many years with Maestro Krzysztof Penderecki . Their goal is to set chamber music on a new track, as well as to constantly expand the repertoire of the piano trio by creating innovative artistic events. The activity of the Penderecki Trio is a tribute to their Patron, one of the most outstanding contemporary composers in the world, Krzysztof Penderecki, who died on March 29, 2020.
In addition to Krzysztof Penderecki's Chaconne, we will hear Fryderyk Chopin's Sonata for piano and cello, and Piano Trio in G major, Op. 40 of Józef Wieniawski.
Chopin's Sonata in G minor is the composer's last work published during his lifetime with opus numbering, and according to critics of Chopin's work, it is to be his last great work. The work was dedicated to Auguste Franchomme. On October 15, 1949, the dying Chopin was supposed to ask for the performance of the Sonata in G minor. The performance did not take place due to an attack of shortness of breath and coughing.
Piano Trio in G major, Op. 40 Józef Wieniawski wrote it in 1885. He dedicated the work to the pianist Carl Reinecke. Born in 1837 in Lublin (Poland) Wieniawski, a professor at the conservatory in Brussels, was the brother of the world-renowned violinist Henryk Wieniawski, and besides, a talented composer whose work perfectly reflects the spirit of chamber music of the late 19th century.
2023 marks the third anniversary of the death and the 90th anniversary of the birth of Krzysztof Penderecki, one of the greatest contemporary composers, whose work had a significant impact on the world music of the 20th and 21st centuries. On July 6, 2023, you will be able to listen to e.g. European and Asian premiere of Krzysztof Penderecki's Chaconne in memorial del Giovani Paolo II performed by the Penderecki Trio.
Chaconne, a piece dedicated to Pope John Paul II, comes from the famous Polish Requiem, a vocal-instrumental work by Penderecki for mixed choir, soloists and orchestra. It was composed in the years 1980-1984. Individual parts commemorate important figures in the history of Poland (hence the name of the work). In 2019, the composer established the Penderecki Trio, to which he planned to invite outstanding soloists known to him in order to popularize contemporary chamber music. He planned to arrange the Chaconne from the Polish Requiem for the Trio, but unfortunately the plans were interrupted by the Composer's death. The work was eventually arranged by his former student and close collaborator, Korean composer Jeajoon Ryu.
The Grammy winning composer and conductor Krzysztof Penderecki was born on 23 November 1933 in Debica, Poland. His works created in the 1960s brought him worldwide fame. His international success was due to such works as "Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima" (gave a lasting musical expression to the age of atom bomb anxiety) or St Luke Passion premiered in Münster Cathedral in 1966.
Many of his works were commissioned for special occasions, like Paradise Lost after Milton, which was written for the US Bicentennial celebrations. Penderecki’s music is regularly performed by the world’s leading soloists and conductors. His compositions were often quoted in films, most famously by Stanley Kubrick in The Shining.
The Penderecki Trio: Leticia Moreno - violin, Claudio Bohorquez - cello, Łukasz Krupinski - piano is a new, excellent music ensemble, with outstanding instrumentalists, winners of international music competitions, and above all, musicians who have been cooperating for many years with Maestro Krzysztof Penderecki . Their goal is to set chamber music on a new track, as well as to constantly expand the repertoire of the piano trio by creating innovative artistic events. The activity of the Penderecki Trio is a tribute to their Patron, one of the most outstanding contemporary composers in the world, Krzysztof Penderecki, who died on March 29, 2020.
 
FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN
Sonata for cello & piano in G minor, Op. 65, CT. 204
Allegro moderato / Scherzo: Allegro con brio / Largo / Finale: Allegro
 
Chopin's cello sonata, Op. 65, was his last major work. Apart from the piano, the cello was the only instrument for which Chopin composed substantial amounts of music; in 1832 he had written the Grand Duo Concertant for the cellist Auguste Franchomme. In part because of the presence of the cello, and in greater part because of the formal characteristics of the piece, the composition of the cello sonata occupied Chopin for an unusually long period. He worked on it through 1845 and well into 1846, sketching and drafting as he had not done before, and at one point complaining to his sister, "I write a little and cross out a lot." Extant sketches show that Chopin did indeed discard an incredible amount of material and redrafted most of his ideas before deciding on the final form of the work. The piece was printed in Paris in 1847. Chopin and Franchomme premiered the sonata in Paris to great acclaim, in what was to be the last performance of Chopin's career.
Much of Chopin's anguish stemmed from his difficulties in the shaping the relationship between the two instruments. That he mostly composed the cello part first was perhaps at the heart of the matter, for Chopin was forced to curb his keyboard tendencies and remove himself from his natural idiom. It is no surprise that the piano part often sounds uncharacteristic of Chopin. Furthermore, because he chose to engage himself with the Germanic sonata idea, as he had in his piano sonatas, he had to set aside his predilection for ternary forms with codas and achieve contrast and develop logical structures in new and unfamiliar ways.
Chopin takes great care to distribute the material equally between the cello and piano, and he accomplishes this goal in a variety of ways. For instance, in the first group of themes in the first movement we hear passages of piano solo, piano with cello accompaniment, cello with a substantial piano counter-subject, cello with only light piano accompaniment, and counterpoint in which the two partners are equal. After the second group opens with rounded phrases for each instrument, a three-part invention involving both instruments ensues. The Germanic aspect of the movement becomes clear in Chopin's development of an integrated sonata form from a few related motives. Inversion and other transformations of motives from the first few measures occur even in the exposition. One of the cello's most important motives, a rising and falling half-step, comes not from the main theme but from prefatory material, and what seem like mere connective gestures evolve into parts of themes. It is not surprising that Chopin moves to the relative major (B flat), but what is striking is his path -- a string of dominant-seventh harmonies -- toward this goal. Throughout, Chopin diminishes the punctuating potential of his cadences by writing continuous melody over them, giving a sense of constant growth.
Chopin creates relationships among the four movements of the sonata through melodic references. The primary cello motive of the first movement, a rising and falling half-step, opens the lush second movement, the folksy scherzo, and the tarantella finale -- further evidence that Chopin was consciously experimenting with German compositional methods. The clear divisions between cello and piano in the second movement contrast with the more integrated use of the instruments in the first movement, while the finale sounds, at times, like Mendelssohn. The end result is a unique, un-Chopinesque work. Description by John Palmer  
 
JOZEF WIENIAWSKI 
Piano Trio
Allegro/ Andante molto cantabile/ Allegro con fuoco / Allegro risoluto e non troppo presto
 
Jozef Wieniawski's Op.40 Piano Trio in G Major dates from 1885 and was dedicated to Carl Reinecke, also a famous pianist and an even more famous teacher of composition at the Leipzig Conservatory as well as director of the Gewandhaus Orchestra. The trio is in four movements opening with a spacious, genial Allegro, full of lovely melodies. The second movement, Andante molto cantabile is followed by an exciting Allegro con fuoco scherzo. The finale, Allegro risoluto e non troppo presto, is full of varied tempi, rich with melody, bringing this fine work to a triumphant close.
 Jozef Wieniawski (1837-1912) was born in the Polish city of Lublin, then part of the Russian empire. Today, if he is remembered at all, it is as the younger brother of the more famous Henryk Wieniawski, one of the most outstanding violinists of all time. However, Jozef, during his lifetime, was one of Europe's best known and leading musicians in his own right. His first lessons were with his mother a fine pianist, a student of Eduard Wolff. At the age of 10, he entered the Paris Conservatory where he studied with Pierre Zimmermann and François Marmontel. Subsequently, a scholarship from the Tsar of Russia enabled him t to study with Franz Liszt. For a while, he performed with his brother Henryk, but then embarked on his own as a touring piano virtuoso and was considered one of the foremost pianists of the time. Liszt thought so well of him that they played duo piano concertos in concert together. Josef knew and was friends with many of the Europe’s leading composers such as Rossini, Gounod, Berlioz and Wagner and was a favorite of several national leaders including Napoleon III and the Tsar. Besides his career as a virtuoso pianist, he was a much sought after conductor and teacher. He served as a professor of piano at both the Moscow Conservatory and the Brussels Conservatory. He did not ignore composition, penning a very successful piano concerto, several other works for piano, as well as a string quartet and this piano trio which were very highly praised.
 
KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI
1st Sonata (1954) version for cello and piano (2020)
Allegro / Andante (attacca) / Allegro vivace
 
Penderecki's dynamic and lyrical "Sonata for Violin and Piano" was composed in 1953 when the composer was only 20 years old and attending the Middle School of Music. Approximately 8 minutes in duration, it is structured in traditional sonata-allegro form, and is a remarkably well-written work even though it is not yet in what were to be the composer's mature styles. Penderecki was a skilled violinist at his young age and his understanding of the instrument is apparent in the fluid writing of this Sonata. In the first movement Allegro, the energetic, sometimes tense, sometimes jolly, Prokofiev-like theme skips and leaps with poignant dissonances from the outset. A second more lyrical and Romantic theme enters soon afterward but lasts only a brief time before the music plunges back into the on-rush of the first subject. A few measures quote the secondary theme briefly, and the movement blasts toward its climax with brilliant double stops and powerful chords. The second movement is an Andante that opens with a plaintively stated, elegiac theme in bare octaves that cycles several times as the violin line emerges from it. The violin plays quasi-improvisational figures and mellismatic variations on the theme. The piano repeats the theme in a high register as a single line which accelerates to a new brisk tempo, as the music seques directly into the third movement's Allegro vivace speed. The foot-tapping third movement has the spirit and harmonic content of a Bartókian folk dance. This is a balanced and enjoyable work, and certain portions of it, especially the lyrical themes of the first and second movements give some hint of his Penderecki's later so-called Romantic period between 1975 - 85. Description by "Blue" Gene Tyranny 
 
KRZYSZTOF PENDERECKI 
Chaconne in memorial del Giovani Paolo II  transcribed by Jaejoon Ryu for a piano trio (2020)
 
The original work providing the basis of this arrangement is the Ciaccona for string orchestra dating from 2005 written on the occasion of the death of Pope Johannes Paul II. The composer incorporated the piece into his large-scale oratorio work Polish Requiem as an instrumental interlude. During the following years, arrangements were made for violin and viola, for piano, for two pianos, for three accordions and for six cellos.
 
 

 

PENDERECKI TRIO - Program - Izmir Festival | İKSEV - İzmir Foundation For Culture Arts And Education